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Sebastian Rind Wine Philosopher

If you’re deep into philosophy, you must drink wine. Lots of wine. It’s logical. At least if you ask an expert. And the expert in this case is Sebastian Rind. He is a philosopher whose profession turned fluid.
You need wine when you’re in your 20s and focused on Kierkegaard’s philosophical anthropology, the quest for authenticity, and his critique of objectivity (in light of contemporary Anglo-American philosophy) ... Here, Rind tells us the story how he got into the wine world:

“I studied philosophy in the early 2000s when my girlfriend’s brother lived with a sommelier in Vienna. They brought some good wine as gifts when they came to visit. I had never tried Austrian wine before and had no expectations. But the more I tried, the more convinced I was about its great quality. And the more intrigued I became because no one wanted anything to do with Austrian wines, due to an additives scandal in the mid-1980s. So during my studies, I emptied quite a few bottles, and I was hooked.”
“With a box of various wines in hand, I took the metro there. They welcomed me; we had a tasting and connected really well – perhaps because our focus was equally unusual at that time.”
When Sebastian finished his studies, the natural question arose: what should I do now? Job offers weren’t a dime a dozen for newly examined philosophers.

“Being a philosopher isn’t like being an architect or dentist. It’s more abstract – it’s basically everything and nothing at the same time. Because I had imported some wine for my own consumption, I thought that perhaps I could sell some to restaurants. But who would be interested in Austrian wines? Back then, the wine world revolved around France, Germany, Italy, and maybe Spain.”

Rind had heard about a recently opened restaurant in Christianshavn. Nobody knew much about it – except that it was a tad strange with cuisine constructed from Nordic-only ingredients such as whale and such things.
“With a box of various wines in hand, I took the metro there. They welcomed me; we had a tasting and connected really well – perhaps because our focus was equally unusual at that time. I acquired my first customer and decided to go for it.”.

Small wonder – because the restaurant was Noma, which was later recognized as the world’s best restaurant. What Noma wanted, many other restaurants wanted too.
“I didn’t have a master plan. I found a place on Esplanaden and thought about what I could do with it. I eventually decided to open a vinotek, which was illegal in Denmark but common on the rest of the continent. It’s a shop in which you can buy wine as takeout and drink wine as in a regular wine bar. Denmark soon changed the rules, and we could open in 2004. We still have our office here.”
As a philosopher you might think Sebastian thinks everything through well in advance, however, most of his success has come from meeting opportunities as they arise. Today he runs wine bars and restaurants – all revolving around Austrian wine.

“I didn’t really plan any of this. I’ve come across places, met people, and jumped at opportunities. It’s like that – I can’t help it. When I see a great opportunity, I just have to take it. So what’s next? I don’t know. Time will tell. Just as long as I can get a good glass of wine in the meantime.”
Want to try some great wine and food? Visit one (or all) of Rind and friends’ restaurants: Lille blå Vinbar, Ved Stranden 10, Admiralgade 26 or Österreich Vin (the import business). Prost!

Sebastian Rind — Wine Philosopher

If you’re deep into philosophy, you must drink wine.
Lots of wine. It’s logical. At least if you ask an expert.
And the expert in this case is Sebastian Rind. He is a
philosopher whose profession turned fluid.
You need wine when you’re in your 20s and focused on Kierkegaard’s philosophical anthropology, the quest for authenticity, and his critique of objectivity (in light of contemporary Anglo-American philosophy) ... Here, Rind tells us the story how he got into the wine world:

“I studied philosophy in the early 2000s when my girlfriend’s brother lived with a sommelier in Vienna. They brought some good wine as gifts when they came to visit. I had never tried Austrian wine before and had no expectations. But the more I tried, the more convinced I was about its great quality. And the more intrigued I became because no one wanted anything to do with Austrian wines, due to an additives scandal in the mid-1980s. So during my studies, I emptied quite a few bottles, and I was hooked.”
When Sebastian finished his studies, the natural question arose: what should I do now? Job offers weren’t a dime a dozen for newly examined philosophers.

“Being a philosopher isn’t like being an architect or dentist. It’s more abstract – it’s basically everything and nothing at the same time. Because I had imported some wine for my own consumption, I thought that perhaps I could sell some to restaurants. But who would be interested in Austrian wines? Back then, the wine world revolved around France, Germany, Italy, and maybe Spain.”

Rind had heard about a recently opened restaurant in Christianshavn. Nobody knew much about it – except that it was a tad strange with cuisine constructed from Nordic-only ingredients such as whale and such things.

“With a box of various wines in hand, I took the metro there. They welcomed me; we had a tasting and connected really well – perhaps because our focus was equally unusual at that time. I acquired my first customer and decided to go for it.”
“With a box of various wines in hand, I took the metro there.
They welcomed me; we had a tasting and connected really well
– perhaps because our focus was equally unusual at that time.”
Small wonder – because the restaurant was Noma, which was later recognized as the world’s best restaurant. What Noma wanted, many other restaurants wanted too.

“I didn’t have a master plan. I found a place on Esplanaden and thought about what I could do with it. I eventually decided to open a vinotek, which was illegal in Denmark but common on the rest of the continent. It’s a shop in which you can buy wine as takeout and drink wine as in a regular wine bar. Denmark soon changed the rules, and we could open in 2004. We still have our office here.”
As a philosopher you might think Sebastian thinks everything through well in advance, however, most of his success has come from meeting opportunities as they arise. Today he runs wine bars and restaurants – all revolving around Austrian wine.

“I didn’t really plan any of this. I’ve come across places, met people, and jumped at opportunities. It’s like that – I can’t help it. When I see a great opportunity, I just have to take it. So what’s next? I don’t know. Time will tell. Just as long as I can get a good glass of wine in the meantime.”

Want to try some great wine and food? Visit one (or all) of Rind and friends’ restaurants: Lille blå Vinbar, Ved Stranden 10, Admiralgade 26 or Österich Vin (the import business). Prost!
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