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GUIDE TO KEEPING YOUR
GARMENTS IN GREAT SHAPE
THE ONES WE LOVE, WE LOOK AFTER. IT’S AS EASY AS THAT.
SO OF COURSE YOU’LL LOOK AFTER YOUR FAVORITE GARMENTS.
HERE WE GATHERED A FEW TIPS ABOUT WASHING, PACKING,
AND CARE. LONG LIVE GREAT CLOTHES!
Keep clean, but don’t wash too much
You naturally want to be clean and neat. That said, please think before you throw garments into the washer. Often, garments don’t need a proper wash. A bit of fresh air, a brush, a night in the freezer, or some ironing will do the trick when it comes to cleaning your favorite clothes.
The result? Your garments last longer, while you save water and treat Mother Nature with tender loving care. Most of the time, a gentle hand wash can replace
the mean machine. If you still want to wash your garments, make sure you do it right. Never overdose with detergent. Even though you have no allergies, choose detergents made for sensitive skin (without perfume). They’re the gentlest choice. Pick detergents marked with eco-friendly symbols. That way, chemicals stay out of subsoil water. Never use bleach. It kills garments and the planet. Save energy by lowering the temperature; 30°C (86°F) is enough to get garments clean.
 
STAIN REMOVAL GUIDE
Tip number one: Remove the stain immediately. The faster, the greater the chance that it disappears. Some stains are harder than others, such as coffee with milk, bananas, and red wine. Boiling water is a miracle remedy for many different types of stains. And carbonated mineral water can dissolve difficult stains.
BEER: Moisten with vinegar and warm water, then rinse and wash with a detergent containing bleach.
BLOOD: Soak as quickly as possible in cold water with a little salt. Wash with detergent containing a lightening/ whitening agent.
CHOCOLATE: Scrape off the chocolate, soak in warm water and soap, rinse in cold water; wash as usual.
COFFEE, TEA: Immediately pour warm water on the garment. Then apply a few drops of laundry detergent. Even quicker, grab some vinegar and mix with water. If the stain is still visible, dab it with hydrogen peroxide (only to white
garments, 1 dl [half cup] to 9 parts water) rinse, wash as usual.
GRASS: Massage gently with rubbing alcohol or hand sanitizer; methylated spirits or white spirits also work. Rinse with warm soapy water. If the stains dried, then dissolve them with equal parts glycerin and hot water – before you wash the usual way.
GREASE: Heat potato flour or cornstarch and rub it on the stain. Brush away the flour and wash immediately as usual. Dissolve old stains with gasoline before washing them with soapy water.
INK (BALLPOINT, FELT TIP): Moisten with rubbing alcohol and wash as usual.
JAM, JELLY: Soak old stains in a borax solution. Otherwise, wash as usual in the machine or by hand – depending on garment.
LIPSTICK: These spots usually disappear in the washing machine. If not, change detergent.
MAKEUP: Pre-treat stains with some liquid detergent. Remove stubborn stains by soaking in a weak ammonia solution, e.g., 5 ml to 500 ml water (1 tsp to 2 cups). Rinse well and wash as usual.
MASCARA: Soak in detergent that has a built-in lightening effect. Wash as usual.
MOLD: The only thing that helps is high-temperature washing with detergent that contains a whitening agent. You can soak white and color-resistant items in a hydrogen peroxide solution. Use 1 part hydrogen peroxide to 9 parts water). Never use bleach with hypochlorite on wool, silk, flame-retardant treated fabric or blended fabric.
NAIL POLISH: First check what the garment is made of. Use oil-free nail polish remover from the back (inside) of the garment. Don’t use on acetate or triacetate fabrics. Then wash as usual.
OIL, LUBRICANTS: Treat severe stains with oil solvents; wash as usual at the highest recommended temperature. If the fabric isn’t suitable for washing, sprinkle talcum powder over small stains, pat it down, then brush it off as soon as the oil is absorbed. Repeat until the stain is gone.
SHOE POLISH: Rub the stain with liquid detergent and wash immediately as recommended by the garment’s care instructions.
TAR: Scrape it off and soften the residue with some glycerin or eucalyptus oil. Pre-treat with liquid detergent, wash as usual.
TOMATO SAUCE: Make a solution of equal parts hot water and glycerin. Soak the garment for an hour; wash as usual.
VOMIT: Scrape it off and rinse well in running water. Soak in a solution of detergent that contains a lightening agent; wash the garment as usual for best results.
WATER-BASED PAINT: Wash immediately with cold water before the stain dries.
WINE: Put something between a red wine stain and layers you’re wearing underneath. Press a paper towel on the stain to absorb the wine; don’t rub. Keep the stain wet until you can treat it properly, i.e., soak it with vinegar, cold water, or soda water. Cover the stain with salt to absorb even more of the wine and lift the stain from the fabric. Carefully press the salt against the damp, stained area. Wash as usual. Treat white wine with cold water or boiling milk.
 
Pack professionally
We’re travelers. We pack and unpack often. Smart packing makes journeys easier and enhances the overall experience.
  • Get a smaller bag; it makes you pack smarter.
  • Use carry-on size to skip the baggage claim.
  • Pack the must-haves not the nice-to-haves.
  • Never pack more than one week of clothing.
  • Pack favorites with a simple color palette to easily mix-and-match every item.
  • Use compression or packing bags.
  • Roll – don’t fold – your garments.
  • Bring a laundry bag with a compression function.
  • Bring a universal travel adaptor.
  • Fill and repack your toiletries in small, travel-size receptacles, insert them into zip-lock bags, and place them so they’re easily accessible.
  • Pack a belt in your hand luggage and put it on after the security control.
  • Copy or photograph important documents, tickets, passports, etc. Send them to your email address.
  • When you’re done packing, take out two items. You probably have packed too much anyway
 
KEEP YOUR GARMENTS A LONG TIME: MEND, REPAIR, AND PASS ON
REMEMBER THE 1980S? If you don’t, then you do now: they were the heydays of patchwork denims. Everybody patched their jeans – the more stiches, the better. We kind of love the idea of mending garments. The concept has been around forever. People just couldn’t always afford to buy new clothes. They had to care for, mend, and repair what they had.
We’re a part of a consumption culture – we won’t deny that. But at our launch, we had a vision and used the expression “the originals of tomorrow.” Consequently, we make timeless pieces that are intended to be worn more than one or two seasons. Garments that are meant to become old friends in your wardrobe. Garments that stand the test of time (and get better with time).
A rip in a pair of pants, a loose thread on a sweater, or a lost jacket button provide character and personalize your garments.
Sustainable thinking is crucial, and we do all we can to minimize our environmental footprint. How? By making things you don’t want to throw away. So please mend, repair, and hold on to your garments. Use your jacket one more season, and you’ll save about 80% in en- ergy consumption – compared to buying a new one.
Imagine handing over a pair of well-worn chinos to your son (born or unborn) when he grows up. Imagine telling him stories about the rips and stains – the odd button, and the way you met his mother.
 
FABRIC
CARE
GUIDE
Knowledge is often a key to success.
And it fits well when it comes to taking
care of your garments. Here’s a quick
guide to the most common materials,
and how to treat them nice.
 
COTTON: Cotton is a natural material and has a harder time retaining colors than synthetic fabric. Consequently, you need to be a little extra careful when washing it. Like all natural materials, it shrinks a little during the first wash. Always turn the garment inside out when washing.
DENIM: Cotton with slightly different properties. Denim is usually colo- red and bleeds naturally during washing (mostly in the beginning). It’s part of the great thing about denim fabric, and achieves a nice patina over time. What you do not want are white creases. So always wash your pants inside out. Do not overdose with detergent. Do not over-pack the machine. And do not leave wet garments in the machine. Dry with the right side out.
LEATHER: Material that possesses its own character. Consequently, various types of leather are dissimilar, which is part of its charm. Leather
garments are best cared for by experts. There is no panacea for cleaning leather. But a slightly damp cloth is the absolute best solution when cle- aning the fabric.
LINEN: A durable natural material with low elasticity, so it wrinkles easily. Use detergent without optical brighteners, because they can bleach linen garments; even sunlight fades colored linen items. Avoid washing in very high temperatures because linen can shrink.
SUEDE: Suede garments should be impregnated before first use. Stains are removed with a slightly damp cloth and then the surface is brushed with a suede brush. If it’s raining, it is wise to leave suede clothing in the closet. It is extremely sensitive to water and can, in the worst case, shrink.
SYNTHETIC: Artificial fabrics are usually stronger and more wrinkle-resistant than natural fabrics. Synthetics don’t easily absorb moisture and they can generate static electricity. Most synthetics are heat sensitive, so avoid hot water washing. A high temperature in combination with a heavily packed machine can lead to creases that never go away and thus ruin the garment’s structure.
WOOL: A unique material with many good properties. When a garment is used or washed, groups of short or broken fibers on the surface of the fabric might get tangled in a tiny knot or ball – a pill. Pick these off by hand. Temperature is crucial. Don’t use hot water! Rinse a wool garment an extra time, put it on a towel, and squeeze out of the water. Always dry it flat. A thorough airing is often enough for woolen garments to regain freshness.
GUIDE TO KEEPING YOUR
GARMENTS IN GREAT SHAPE
THE ONES WE LOVE, WE LOOK AFTER. IT’S AS
EASY AS THAT. SO OF COURSE YOU’LL LOOK AFTER
YOUR FAVORITE GARMENTS. HERE WE GATHERED
A FEW TIPS ABOUT WASHING, PACKING, AND CARE.
LONG LIVE GREAT CLOTHES!
Keep clean, but
don’t wash too much
You naturally want to be clean and neat. That said, please think before you throw garments into the washer. Often, garments don’t need a proper wash. A bit of fresh air, a brush, a night in the freezer, or some ironing will do the trick when it comes to cleaning your favorite clothes.
The result? Your garments last longer, while you save water and treat Mother Nature with tender loving care. Most of the time, a gentle hand wash can replace the mean machine. If you still want to wash your garments, make sure you do it right. Never overdose with detergent. Even though you have no allergies, choose detergents made for sensitive skin (without perfume). They’re the gentlest choice. Pick detergents marked with eco-friendly symbols. That way, chemicals stay out of subsoil water. Never use bleach. It kills garments and the planet. Save energy by lowering the temperature; 30°C (86°F) is enough to get garments clean.
 
STAIN REMOVAL GUIDE
Tip number one: Remove the stain immediately. The faster, the greater the chance that it disappears. Some stains are harder than others, such as coffee with milk, bananas, and red wine. Boiling water is a miracle remedy for many different types of stains. And carbonated mineral water can dissolve difficult stains.
BEER: Moisten with vinegar and warm water, then rinse and wash with a detergent containing bleach.
BLOOD: Soak as quickly as possible in cold water with a little salt. Wash with detergent containing a lightening/ whitening agent.
CHOCOLATE: Scrape off the chocolate, soak in warm water and soap, rinse in cold water; wash as usual.
COFFEE, TEA: Immediately pour warm water on the garment. Then apply a few drops of laundry detergent. Even quicker, grab some vinegar and mix with water. If the stain is still visible, dab it with hydrogen peroxide (only to white
garments, 1 dl [half cup] to 9 parts water) rinse, wash as usual.
GRASS: Massage gently with rubbing alcohol or hand sanitizer; methylated spirits or white spirits also work. Rinse with warm soapy water. If the stains dried, then dissolve them with equal parts glycerin and hot water – before you wash the usual way.
GREASE: Heat potato flour or cornstarch and rub it on the stain. Brush away the flour and wash immediately as usual. Dissolve old stains with gasoline before washing them with soapy water.
INK (BALLPOINT, FELT TIP): Moisten with rubbing alcohol and wash as usual.
JAM, JELLY: Soak old stains in a borax solution. Otherwise, wash as usual in the machine or by hand – depending on garment.
LIPSTICK: These spots usually disappear in the washing machine. If not, change detergent.
MAKEUP: Pre-treat stains with some liquid detergent. Remove stubborn stains by soaking in a weak ammonia solution, e.g., 5 ml to 500 ml water (1 tsp to 2 cups). Rinse well and wash as usual.
MASCARA: Soak in detergent that has a built-in lightening effect. Wash as usual.
MOLD: The only thing that helps is high-temperature washing with detergent that contains a whitening agent. You can soak white and color-resistant items in a hydrogen peroxide solution. Use 1 part hydrogen peroxide to 9 parts water). Never use bleach with hypochlorite on wool, silk, flame-retardant treated fabric or blended fabric.
NAIL POLISH: First check what the garment is made of. Use oil-free nail polish remover from the back (inside) of the garment. Don’t use on acetate or triacetate fabrics. Then wash as usual.
OIL, LUBRICANTS: Treat severe stains with oil solvents; wash as usual at the highest recommended temperature. If the fabric isn’t suitable for washing, sprinkle talcum powder over small stains, pat it down, then brush it off as soon as the oil is absorbed. Repeat until the stain is gone.
SHOE POLISH: Rub the stain with liquid detergent and wash immediately as recommended by the garment’s care instructions.
TAR: Scrape it off and soften the residue with some glycerin or eucalyptus oil. Pre-treat with liquid detergent, wash as usual.
TOMATO SAUCE: Make a solution of equal parts hot water and glycerin. Soak the garment for an hour; wash as usual.
VOMIT: Scrape it off and rinse well in running water. Soak in a solution of detergent that contains a lightening agent; wash the garment as usual for best results.
WATER-BASED PAINT: Wash immediately with cold water before the stain dries.
WINE: Put something between a red wine stain and layers you’re wearing underneath. Press a paper towel on the stain to absorb the wine; don’t rub. Keep the stain wet until you can treat it properly, i.e., soak it with vinegar, cold water, or soda water. Cover the stain with salt to absorb even more of the wine and lift the stain from the fabric. Carefully press the salt against the damp, stained area. Wash as usual. Treat white wine with cold water or boiling milk.
 
Pack professionally
We’re travelers. We pack and unpack often. Smart packing makes journeys easier and enhances the overall experience.
  • Get a smaller bag; it makes you pack smarter.
  • Use carry-on size to skip the baggage claim.
  • Pack the must-haves not the nice-to-haves.
  • Never pack more than one week of clothing.
  • Pack favorites with a simple color palette to easily mix-and-match every item.
  • Use compression or packing bags.
  • Roll – don’t fold – your garments.
  • Bring a laundry bag with a compression function.
  • Bring a universal travel adaptor.
  • Fill and repack your toiletries in small, travel-size receptacles, insert them into zip-lock bags, and place them so they’re easily accessible.
  • Pack a belt in your hand luggage and put it on after the security control.
  • Copy or photograph important documents, tickets, passports, etc. Send them to your email address.
  • When you’re done packing, take out two items. You probably have packed too much anyway
 
KEEP YOUR GARMENTS A LONG TIME: MEND, REPAIR, AND PASS ON
REMEMBER THE 1980S? If you don’t, then you do now: they were the heydays of patchwork denims. Everybody patched their jeans – the more stiches, the better. We kind of love the idea of mending garments. The concept has been around forever. People just couldn’t always afford to buy new clothes. They had to care for, mend, and repair what they had.
We’re a part of a consumption culture – we won’t deny that. But at our launch, we had a vision and used the expression “the originals of tomorrow.” Consequently, we make timeless pieces that are intended to be worn more than one or two seasons. Garments that are meant to become old friends in your wardrobe. Garments that stand the test of time (and get better with time). A rip in a pair of pants, a loose thread on a sweater, or a lost jacket button provide character and personalize your garments.
Sustainable thinking is crucial, and we do all we can to minimize our environmental footprint. How? By making things you don’t want to throw away. So please mend, repair, and hold on to your garments. Use your jacket one more season, and you’ll save about 80% in en- ergy consumption – compared to buying a new one.
Imagine handing over a pair of well-worn chinos to your son (born or unborn) when he grows up. Imagine telling him stories about the rips and stains – the odd button, and the way you met his mother.
 
FABRIC
CARE
GUIDE
Knowledge is often a key to success.
And it fits well when it comes to taking
care of your garments. Here’s a quick
guide to the most common materials,
and how to treat them nice.
COTTON: Cotton is a natural material and has a harder time retaining colors than synthetic fabric. Consequently, you need to be a little extra careful when washing it. Like all natural materials, it shrinks a little during the first wash. Always turn the garment inside out when washing.
DENIM: Cotton with slightly different properties. Denim is usually colo- red and bleeds naturally during washing (mostly in the beginning). It’s part of the great thing about denim fabric, and achieves a nice patina over time. What you do not want are white creases. So always wash your pants inside out. Do not overdose with detergent. Do not over-pack the machine. And do not leave wet garments in the machine. Dry with the right side out.
LEATHER: Material that possesses its own character. Consequently, various types of leather are dissimilar, which is part of its charm. Leather
garments are best cared for by experts. There is no panacea for cleaning leather. But a slightly damp cloth is the absolute best solution when cle- aning the fabric.
LINEN: A durable natural material with low elasticity, so it wrinkles easily. Use detergent without optical brighteners, because they can bleach linen garments; even sunlight fades colored linen items. Avoid washing in very high temperatures because linen can shrink.
SUEDE: Suede garments should be impregnated before first use. Stains are removed with a slightly damp cloth and then the surface is brushed with a suede brush. If it’s raining, it is wise to leave suede clothing in the closet. It is extremely sensitive to water and can, in the worst case, shrink.
SYNTHETIC: Artificial fabrics are usually stronger and more wrinkle-resistant than natural fabrics. Synthetics don’t easily absorb moisture and they can generate static electricity. Most synthetics are heat sensitive, so avoid hot water washing. A high temperature in combination with a heavily packed machine can lead to creases that never go away and thus ruin the garment’s structure.
WOOL: A unique material with many good properties. When a garment is used or washed, groups of short or broken fibers on the surface of the fabric might get tangled in a tiny knot or ball – a pill. Pick these off by hand. Temperature is crucial. Don’t use hot water! Rinse a wool garment an extra time, put it on a towel, and squeeze out of the water. Always dry it flat. A thorough airing is often enough for woolen garments to regain freshness.
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